Tag Archives: Marketing Research

Web Views and Traffic Mean Nothing

Just because something is easy to measure doesn’t make it the most important thing to measure.

Both Ron and Fleet Street PR have interesting rants on the overreaction to views of viral video campaigns, questioning if the views really mean that much. And if they don’t, what does?

Here’s my take: Views mean something only in that they are a prerequisite to what you’re really wanting. That might seem like an overly simple statement, but it’s true. It’s a step in the right direction, but in and of itself, views and traffic mean nothing.

Exposure can only expose. It’s what’s revealed thereafter that prompts a response.

The thing to measure is what people do with that view. Do they click for more info? Do they make a purchase? Do they email it on to friends? Do they post it on a blog? Do the people they share it with seem like likely candidates to purchase? Do they leave a comment proclaiming how much they disliked it? Do they watch the whole video, or do they close it down 7 seconds into it?
All of that is a lot harder and more tedious to track than views. That’s probably why it doesn’t happen much. But it’s not impossible. Drill down into your analytics and see what you can figure out.

More importantly, figure out what really determines success to begin with. Popularity meant something in high school; it means a lot less in business. What’s going to actually make a difference for your business? Referrals? Purchases? Comments? Then measure that. Too often, those involved don’t remember what it is that matters; they just start making a big deal out of what is happening (like high traffic) and start talking up its importance. Bad move.

Quality will always outperform quantity. Always. Which means you’ve got a lot more to measure than traffic. Start asking if it’s the right traffic. Then ask if you’re getting the right reactions. And when you’re not, do something about it other than just getting more traffic.

Useless Research from BrandWeek

Ron responds to a new survey featured in BrandWeek that, sadly, reveals absolutely nothing and pretty much makes a mockery of good marketing research.

My quick thoughts on it:

  1. On targeting: How in the world can you be considered a marketing executive (MENG) and still basically admit to targeting the world? The study shows that this group of marketing execs will pretty much target ages 20 – 65 with the same amount of focus? To truly have a target, you have to be willing to say “no” to everything outside of that target.
  2. On Green Marketing: I basically commented this on Ron’s blog, but as we hear more and more about the importance of Green Marketing, we must realize that it is becoming a commodity in marketing, not really something that makes you stand out. It’s something that consumers are checking off their list of requirements, not something that makes you different. I still believe most consumers aren’t really that concerned with the environment, but they don’t want to be seen as unconcerned. So seeing “green” or “natural” or “organic” or “eco-friendly” is all they need, and then they move on deeper into the sales cycle.

Yellow Pages Advertising is Still Good Advertising

I guess the Ad Guru knows a thing or two.

Reading the findings of a recent study on MarketingCharts.com, I was surprised to see just how successful YellowBook advertising still is in a world supposedly driven by the almighty web.

Some other morsels from the study:

  • 82% of online local searchers follow up offline, via an in-store visit, phone call, or purchase; of these searchers, 61% went on to make purchases.
  • Traditional advertising triggers branded online searches:
    • Between 60% and 90% of searches for heavily advertised categories such as pizza, insurance, banks and financial institutions were branded
    • 30-50% of keyword searches were general in nature for low-branded categories, including Auto Service and Home Services.
  • A majority of local searchers – 60% – first go online for conducting a local search:
    • 30% of searchers use general search engines, such as Yahoo or Google.
    • 17% use internet yellow pages (IYPs)
    • 13% use local search sites, such as Citysearch.

What does it mean? There are all kinds of takes. For one, it only fortifies the popular belief that it’s small, local business that can actually grow the most due to “New” Marketing. Secondly, it gives new value to traditional advertising. If an ad leads to a branded search, and 60% of the time that leads to a purchase, then that’s saying something.